Hi,

I wanted to reach out to you, and let you know that the Adams & Broomfield Counties Victory office is open. We are in the same location we were in 2012, at the corner of E. 104th and York.

If Republicans are going to win this year we are going to need all the help we can get. We need to reach out to voters as many times as we can between now and November. Please consider spending some time making phone calls here at the office, or knocking doors in your neighborhood. The more times we reach out to voters the more likely we are to make an impact this year.

Thanks,
Kristian Hemphill
Adams & Broomfield Counties Field Director
2200 E. 104th Ave #103,
Thornton, CO 80233
(c) 720-723-0211
Kristian@cologop.org

 

RCyT7

The difference between the Adams County Republicans and the Adams County Democrats:

“We want to control our own life, not yours”

“We support every individual choice that does not take away someone else’s choice”.

“Freedom and Liberty vs. Control”

It’s an easy decision for us….

http://www.thepartyofchoice.com/

 

Mary Rafferty canvasses the Cherry Creek area Sept. 10, 2014 knocking on doors trying to get people to vote for Mark Udall. The "ground game" of

Mary Rafferty canvasses the Cherry Creek area Sept. 10, 2014 knocking on doors trying to get people to vote for Mark Udall. The “ground game” of politics could see its fiercest fighting to date in Colorado this year. (John Leyba, The Denver Post)

WASHINGTON — Mary Rafferty got married in June, but she’s delaying her honeymoon until after Election Day for a not-so-tropical getaway: an air bed in Denver that lets her knock on doors in support of Democrat Mark Udall and his re-election campaign.

Walking a similar beat is Rudy Zitti, a former Long Island police officer who’s making the rounds for the conservative group Americans for Prosperity and its goal of limited government.

The two activists are among the hundreds of political foot soldiers expected to flood Colorado neighborhoods ahead of the Nov. 4 election.

While invasions of this kind are nothing new, several factors are converging on Colorado this year that could make the state home to the fiercest “ground war” in the country.

THE SPOT BLOG

Politics & Policy - The Spot Blog

Not only does the Centennial State feature three high-stakes races — for governor, the U.S. Senate and a U.S. House seat — but the state’s new liberal voting laws invite huge spending on get-out-the-vote efforts across the political spectrum.

Traditional campaigns now are competing for doorstep time with third-party groups focused on issues ranging from health care and the federal debt to conservation and reproductive rights.

And it’s not a last-minute effort either.

Rafferty, 29, already has visited the homes of hundreds of Colorado voters; Zitti, 68, said he is in the thousands now. And both say their conversations with average Coloradans could turn the tide this election year.

“Yes, some people slam the door in your face,” said Zitti, who now lives in Colorado. “(But) face-to-face engagement with people is what I really think is the key to pushing Americans for Prosperity’s message.”

Added Rafferty, who is with the pro-Udall group Colorado Fair Share: “This is the most important thing I could be doing. It’s a really critical election.”

Rafferty is not alone in that assessment — at least if political advertising is any indication. More than $60 million has been spent this year on TV ads alone in the state, according to researchtabulated by journalist Sandra Fish for Colorado Public Radio.

And that figure doesn’t include the millions of dollars that outside groups and the political parties have pledged to sink into get-out-the-vote operations in Colorado.

While the overall cost of these efforts is difficult to determine, the expectation among state politicos is that 2014 could be a record-setting year for the amount of money devoted to grassroots efforts in a nonpresidential election.

“There’s a larger investment in the ground game as opposed to four years ago,” said Steve Fenberg, executive director of the get-out-the-vote group New Era Colorado.

While candidates and political parties have been active before, he said “it seems like there are a lot more independent players.”

Cost-effectiveness

One potential explanation is that get-out-the-vote operations are much cheaper than television and, given advances in campaign record-keeping, canvassers can focus their attention on the homes of likely supporters.

“To put all your eggs in the broadcast basket means that hundreds of thousands of voters won’t hear your message,” said Mitch Stewart, who led the effort in so-called “battleground states” for President Barack Obama during the 2012 campaign.

Rudy Zitti, a former beat cop from Long Island who now works for Americans for Prosperity, goes door-to-door handing out informational flyers and talking

Rudy Zitti, a former beat cop from Long Island who now works for Americans for Prosperity, goes door-to-door handing out informational flyers and talking to voters in Loveland on Sept. 10, 2014. (RJ Sangosti, The Denver Post)

Now consulting with the Environmental Defense Fund, Stewart is part of the group’s $2 million drive this year to get 100,000 Colorado residents to pledge to vote.

“The goal is to increase turnout with a specific group of millennials” who care about climate change, he said. And if this “test run” of voter “data targeting” is successful, officials with the Environmental Defense Fund said they plan to replicate the effort nationwide.

“If you want to be impactful as an organization, you have to use 21st-century tactics,” Stewart said.

A similar calculation is being made by Americans for Prosperity, the political heavyweight backed by billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch.

“We’re trying to build a grassroots army,” said Dustin Zvonek, head of the group’s Colorado affiliate. A giant in the political world, Americans for Prosperity is no stranger to television — having run TV ads in Colorado as early as last October.

But Zvonek said reaching like-minded voters — and getting them to vote — is the real key to winning elections.

“The hard work, but the most important work, is the ground effort,” Zvonek said. With a team of roughly 35 members, the state chapter of AFP is “knocking on 10,000 doors every week in Colorado,” he said.

When they do, staff members often use a four-question survey to determine voters’ views toward federal spending and the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as “Obamacare.”

It’s the health care question that Zvonek said ultimately could produce the biggest payoff with Colorado voters.

“Opinions on Obamacare are not strong,” he said. “We really have an opportunity to educate them more.”

Early voting

There’s plenty of time to make an impact, too. Colorado has a lengthy early-voting period, which begins in mid-October.

“We don’t have an Election Day anymore,” Zvonek said. “We have an Election Deadline.”

He added that his team is planning a “mad scramble” to knock on doors once the state sends out mail-in ballots — as this year will be the first major election in which every active Colorado voter will get one.

Many of these homes will house the same voters who took the four-question survey for Americans for Prosperity.

“Inevitably, there are a lot of ballots that will be tossed in the trash,” Zvonek said. “We’re trying to minimize that.”

Another new wrinkle for the general election season is that Colorado residents now can register to vote and cast a ballot on the same day, thanks to a Democratic-backed law passed in 2013.

“The fact that Colorado makes it easier for its citizens to vote was one of the factors we looked at in choosing the state for this project,” said Keith Gaby, a spokesman for the Environmental Defense Fund.

While the group aims to motivate a specific kind of voter, it’s not officially targeting any candidate or race.

That’s not the case for another environmental group: NextGen Climate. The new organization, backed by billionaire investor and eco-activist Tom Steyer, is taking direct aim at U.S. Rep. Cory Gardner, the Republican challenging Udall.

Not only is NextGen Climate buying TV ads against Gardner, but it’s also launching a major canvassing effort. With a crew of at least 68 workers, the group is “targeting a universe of 88,000 voters living in the Boulder and Denver metro areas,” according to a strategic “blueprint” released by the organization.

Craig Hughes, a consultant for NextGen Climate in Colorado, said the group aims to have “significant investment” on television but a “bigger investment in on-the-ground operations.”

“At some point there are diminishing returns on TV,” he said.

The Internet

In trying to build these election-year armies, outside groups are turning to Craigslist and other mediums to attract staff members. At least four groups recently posted ads on Craigslist in Boulder to recruit canvassers and other campaign workers.

How much these standing armies, or Colorado’s new voting rules, will affect turnout remains an open question — and one that could determine who wins the Udall-Gardner race and which party controls the Senate next year.

Driving up turnout is especially important for Democrats, who historically lose supporters during elections in which the presidential race is not on the ballot.

The lack of participation is especially pronounced among non-white voters, unmarried women and Americans younger than 30, according to forecasts released by the Voter Participation Center, an advocacy group devoted to increasing turnout by these groups.

Although Colorado is split almost in half between voters who fit these three categories and those that do not, the group estimates that a much larger percentage of single women, non-white voters and the young won’t go the polls this year.

In raw numbers, about 361,000 Democratic-leaning voters in Colorado are not expected to cast a ballot this year, compared with about 293,000 truants who are more likely to support the GOP.

Adding to Democratic woes are Obama’s low poll numbers, which suggest a significant uphill climb for his party and its allies.

To compensate, Colorado Democrats are trying to replicate successful get-out-the-vote efforts used by Obama in 2012 and now-U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet in 2010, who also brings the support of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee he chairs.

Udall’s campaign and the DSCC teamed up last month, for example, to hit Gardner with a Spanish-language ad.

“This will be far and away the biggest midterm effort that Colorado has ever seen,” said Chris Harris, a Udall spokesman.

Harris said the Udall campaign, with help from the state party, has the goal of registering 100,000 Colorado voters with an outreach effort of 8,000 to 10,000 volunteers.

Polls have shown the Senate race is neck-and-neck. But Republicans say Democrats are overpromising, and they argue evidence of a GOP advantage can be seen in the state’s voter rolls.

As of Sept. 1, there were roughly 57,000 more registered Republicans in Colorado than registered Democrats. Last year the GOP’s edge in registration was about 28,000 — roughly half that.

“We’re doing a better job of keeping our folks engaged than they are,” said Michael Short, a spokesman for the Republican National Committee. He said the RNC has put staff in Colorado for more than a year and that the outreach is part of a national $100 million investment in get-out-the-vote operations.

Short also said Republicans have invested heavily in shoring up the technology side of campaigning to narrow — or even overcome — the advantage Democrats have enjoyed in recent years.

Television ads

The focus on grassroots organizing, however, hasn’t sated the appetite for television advertising. The $60 million in political ads bought so far this year would “fill 25 straight days of viewing,” according to Fish’s research on Colorado Public Radio.

Those purchases are almost evenly divided between Democrats and their allies and Republicans and their supporters — with Democrats slightly ahead with nearly $28.6 million in spending versus roughly $26.2 million for Republicans. Unaffiliated groups make up the remaining $5.5 million.

“They all seem to want those television ads more than anything,” said Craig Holman, an expert on campaign-finance reform with the liberal advocacy group Public Citizen.

He said fears about the potential for bombarding voters with ads — in that they start to tune them out by Labor Day — hasn’t registered with political consultants or campaigns.

“I swear only political scientists realize it,” he said.

The sheer amount of money involved has been made possible thanks to recent court rulings that have loosened rules on spending. The flood of cash since then has prompted Holman and others to raise concerns about whether special interests are taking over U.S. elections.

In the 2012 election, outside groups — not including candidates or the political parties — spentmore than $1 billion trying to sway voters, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

Some of these are well-known, such as Americans for Prosperity, which was part of $719 million in spending for conservative groups, compared with about $293 million for liberal groups that year.

Spending rules

In response to the flood of money, federal lawmakers have proposed putting some kind of limit or rules on the spending — or at least require more disclosure from the outside groups that engage in the political process. But these efforts have stalled, and there’s little expectation that they will advance anytime soon.

All of which means that the waves of activists canvassing in Colorado this year could became a permanent campaign fixture — and that’s not necessarily a bad thing, said one outreach organizer.

Wendy Wendlandt, the national director of Fair Share, compared the attitude of Colorado residents to those living in another bellwether state in the middle of the country.

“It’s become a little bit like Iowa,” she said. “Everyone (in Colorado) cares deeply about being talked to and they expect to be talked to.”

And so, she said, her group plans to establish offices across the state that will serve as a home base for workers such as Rafferty who are trying to bring a “simple message” to voters across the state.

“This is a human on your doorstep who cares about these issues,” she said. “And you should, too.”

Mark K. Matthews: 202-662-8907, mmatthews@denverpost.com or twitter.com/mkmatthews

http://www.denverpost.com/election2014/ci_26529282/activists-target-colorado-ground-game-fight

stan martinThe Republican contender for Adams County clerk filed suit against his Democratic opponent Wednesday, claiming she doesn’t live in the county.

The suit against Cynthia Martinez, which was filed by her opponent Stan Martin in Adams County District Court, claims that
Martinez actually lives with her husband and kids in Boulder County.

“Adams County residents deserve to be represented by one of their own, somebody who is invested in Adams County, not Boulder,” Martin said in a release.

Martinez said in an interview that while she does have a home in Lafayette where her family lives, she spends most of her time at another home she owns in Brighton, where she takes care of her mother.

“I am in Brighton the majority of the time,” she said when asked the location of her primary residence.

She said the issue came up five years ago when she ran for mayor of Brighton. A court hearing on the lawsuit is expected in the next seven to 10 days.

John Aguilar: 303-954-1695, jaguilar@denverpost.com or twitter.com/abuvthefold

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_26514572/adams-county-clerk-gop-hopeful-claims-opponent-doesnt

A state lawmaker wants Colorado schools with American Indian mascots to get approval to continue using them from the Native American community. If the mascots, names or imagery are not approved, and the school continues using it, the proposal would block the schools from receiving state funds.

Representative Joe Salazar, D-Thornton, said he plans to introduce the bill at the beginning of next year’s legislative session in January.

“We don’t have to give funding to a school or public education institution that wants to engage in derogatory behavior,” explained Representative Salazar.

There is an ongoing debate about Native American-themed mascots, one that has centered on the NFL’s Washington Redskins.

More than a dozen Colorado schools still have Indian-themed mascots, including Lamar High School, home of the Savages, Eaton High School, home of the reds, and the Yuma High School Indians.

The bill proposed by Salazar would allow the Native American community to decide if the mascots and imagery are offensive.

It would require schools with Indian-themed mascots to get approval by representatives from the Indian community. Mascots or imagery deemed offensive could no longer be used, and public schools who decide to continue using the mascots would then be stripped of state funds.

“Why is a law needed?” asked 7NEWS Reporter Jennifer Kovaleski.

“The reason the law is necessary is because we do have schools that are resistant to wanting to change these derogatory images,” said Salazar. “I believe there is a school up in the east area of Colorado that uses savages as their mascot and that is wholly — and by any measure — derogatory and offensive.”

Some Colorado teams previously dropped their Indian-themed mascots. Arvada High School switched from Redskins to the Reds in 1993, and the school adopted a Bulldog mascot.

Arapahoe High School has kept its mascot, the Warriors, but had the logo designed by a Native American artist. Salazar said those schools are the model.

“Those that have already received that type of approval have reached out to the respective tribes they won’t have to go through that process,” he explained.

Salazar said the bill is still in the early stages. He plans to get more input from the public during a community meeting scheduled at the Denver Indian Family Resource Center, 4407 Morrison Road, from 4:30-7p.m. on Sept. 10.

Similar bills have been introduced in the state legislature, but did not pass.

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/bill-would-require-school-mascots-get-approval-from-the-indian-community-or-risk-losing-funding

The current HD31 representative, Joe Salazar, is so out-of-touch with Colorado and our values. Instead of focusing on putting Colorado first, improving the education system, and making your life better, he’s proving how misguided he is by trying to drum up support to reduce public education spending if your school has a Native American mascot name . Colorado has a long and proud tradition of honoring our Native American culture.Joe doesn’t think so.

I agree with my friend, Clarice Navarro-Ratzlaff who pointed this out:

‘We know better than you.’


When politicians from the Denver Metro Area try to mandate what our local school districts do, that is what they are saying. ‘We know better than you.’
You may have seen recently that a Democrat Representative wants to cut off state education funding for schools that use Native American mascots or names. I believe and trust in my local school districts to make the decisions regarding their names and mascots. We don’t need someone from the outside the area trying to use our children’s education as leverage in their push to tell us what to do.

Join me in fighting for the right to local control of our school districts. Help me stand up to those who would tell us ‘We know better than you.’

Thank you for your support. Contact me or my team to display one or more of my yard signs. All contributions are appreciated to help replace my so out-of-touch opponent. To learn more about me, go to http://www.beckler4hd31.com/. You can also donate to my campaign as I need your help if you want Colorado to win….
Thank you again!
Carol
303-564-4257
jodycjb@gmail.com

Photo: The current HD31 representative, Joe Salazar, is so out-of-touch with Colorado and our values.  Instead of focusing on putting Colorado first, improving the education system, and making your life better, he's proving how misguided he is by trying to drum up support to reduce public education spending if your school has a Native American mascot name .  Colorado has a long and proud tradition of honoring our Native American culture. </p><br />
<p>Joe doesn't think so.  </p><br />
<p>I agree with my friend, Clarice Navarro-Ratzlaff who pointed this out: </p><br />
<p>‘We know better than you.’<br /><br />
When politicians from the Denver Metro Area try to mandate what our local school districts do, that is what they are saying. ‘We know better than you.’</p><br />
<p>You may have seen recently that a Democrat Representative wants to cut off state education funding for schools that use Native American mascots or names. I believe and trust in my local school districts to make the decisions regarding their names and mascots. We don’t need someone from the outside the area trying to use our children’s education as leverage in their push to tell us what to do.</p><br />
<p>Join me in fighting for the right to local control of our school districts. Help me stand up to those who would tell us ‘We know better than you.’</p><br />
<p>Thank you for your support.  Contact me or my team to display one or more of my yard signs.  All contributions are appreciated to help replace my so out-of-touch opponent.  To learn more about me, go to http://www.beckler4hd31.com/.  You can also donate to my campaign as I need your help if you want Colorado to win....<br /><br />
Thank you again!<br /><br />
Carol<br /><br />
303-564-4257<br /><br />
jodycjb@gmail.com

 

Did you hear me Tuesday afternoon discussing the Native American school mascot issue brought up by my out-of-touch opponent on 710KNUS during “Kelley and Company”? You can listen here to the podast:

Join me in fighting for the right to local control of our school districts. Help me stand up to those who would tell us ‘We know better than you.’

Thank you for your support. Contact me or my team to display one or more of my yard signs. All contributions are appreciated to help replace my “I know better than you” opponent. To learn more about me, go to http://www.beckler4hd31.com/. You can also donate to my campaign as I need your help if you want Colorado to win….
Thank you again!
Carol
303-564-4257
jodycjb@gmail.com

In Colorado, embattled Democrat Sen. Mark Udall won’t debate Cory Gardner on any of the Denver television stations. Too busy, he says. When you don’t have a record to run on and you’re a member of the party with the President saying the “Lie of the Year.” He’s trying to change the narrative from no jobs and the poor economy to a war on women and income inequality. Uh huh…..

SD24 is issuing a challenge to Adams County Senate District 24 residents. Get involved in our campaign today!

There are 35 days until ballots go out in the mail, military ballots will be mailed this month. Step up and get involved now in the SD24 campaign. This is a very winnable race folks so step up to do your part to help us win the Senate District 24 seat.

Go to the website www.BethforSenate.net to make a campaign contribution (whether small $5 or up to the individual max of $400, any amount will help our efforts to win.) Sign up to sponsor a 3′ x 6′ sign, sign up to sponsor a 4′ x 8′ sign, Volunteer to walk or sign up to host a yard sign. We need you today! Help us walk your precinct to get the word out.

Do you want to see change for Colorado in the next four years? I am the SD24 candidate who will make a difference and bring about the change that is needed now.

Help Colorado’s economic future success, Help businesses grow so that jobs can be created, Help provide a world-class education for our kids, Help Veterans & Seniors get the care and respect they deserve and Help support plans to improve transportation and infrastructure needs by working with me to win the Senate District 24 seat. TOGETHER – WE CAN, and WE WILL WIN on NOV. 4TH!

Will 2014 be the year that voters in Colorado school districts loosen up their wallets and approve well more than $1 billion in local tax increases for school construction and operations?

A year ago, voters were almost as skeptical of local proposals as they were of Amendment 66, the $1 billion K-12 statewide income tax hike that was defeated overwhelmingly. Hoping that voters are in a different mood this year, some two dozen Colorado school districts are seeking some $1.4 billion in property tax increases for construction projects and operating funds.

“On the bond side, it’s going to be the largest group of bonds that anybody’s ever seen,” said Tracie Rainey, executive director of the Colorado School Finance Project, which compiled the detailed list displayed at the bottom of this article.

This year’s ballot measures are interesting for several important reasons, including:

A big year– The total $1.4 billion request exceeds the nearly $1.2 billion districts proposed in 2012, although there were 38 measures on the ballot that year, compared to about 30 this year.

Boulder has biggest ask– The Boulder Valley School District is asking for a $576.4 million bond issue this year, exceeding the high set previously by the $515 million combined bond and override requested – and won – by Denver Public Schools in 2012.

Five Adams districts asking– Most of the money – about $1.1 billion – is being requested from voters in just two counties, Adams and Boulder. Five districts in western Adams all are on the Nov. 4 ballot, an apparently unprecedented event.

Financial pressures– Despite a modest bump in school funding provided by the 2014 legislature, district leaders say that additional money is far from enough, and they have to ask voters for additional local revenues to cover building and program needs that can’t be put off.

A possible distraction– A statewide casino-expansion proposal, Amendment 68, is also on the ballot, and it promises more than $100 million in additional revenues for schools. District leaders are skeptical of A68’s promises and hope it doesn’t confuse voters about the need for local revenue. (Get details on A68 here.)

BEST off the ballot– For the first time in several years, 2014 ballots don’t include a long list of small districts seeking bond issues to raise local matching funds for Building Excellent Schools Today construction program grants. The state portion of that program has reached its ceiling for larger projects such as new schools and major renovations, so there’s no money for locals to match.

Voter mood– Finally, the 2014 election may provide an update on where some voters stand on school taxes. Voter attitudes have been on a roller coaster in this decade. District tax proposals received reasonable support in 2010, but 2011 was the worst year in memory for bonds and overrides. Voters were very supportive in 2012 but returned to their skeptical ways last year. Of course, voters rejected statewide proposals to increases taxes for schools in 2011 and 2013.

Boulder – the big ask

“This is a big ask, we understand that,” says Boulder Valley Superintendent Bruce Messinger when questioned about his district’s proposal for a $576.4 million bond issue. “It’s a hard choice.”

But, he added, “The facilities needs are not going to go away,” and if building systems begin to fail the 30,500-student district isn’t in a position to cover significant building costs from its general fund.

About half the money would be used to bring all district buildings “to acceptable standards,” he said, with the rest devoted to a variety of other needs. (See the district’s detailed facilities plan here.)

As is common with larger districts, Boulder went through a long planning and public consultation process before the board approved the ballot proposal in August.

Messinger said polling put the district’s overall approval rating is at “an all-time high” and that polling and focus groups indicate, “Taxpayers understand … schools are assets.”

While Messinger is feeling reasonably good about the proposal’s chances, he does note the possible of confusion with Amendment 68. “It’s a concern,” he said. “It’s on people’s minds.”

Boulder has had a history of success with its voters. It last lost an election in 2002, when voters rejected a $7.5 million override that would have funded technology improvements.

Adco’s “referendum” on school spending

While Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties have but one school district each, Adams County is served by seven. Each district is considerably smaller than DPS or Jeffco, but combined the five largest districts in Adams had about the same enrollment as their neighboring counties did in 2013-14, about 85,000 students.

This year most Adams County voters have the rare opportunity to vote on school taxes at the same time. Those five districts – Adams 12-Five Star, Brighton, Commerce City (Adams 14), Mapleton and Westminster (Adams 50) – all have proposals on the ballot.

All five are seeking both bond issues and overrides for varying reasons. Each district is seeking bond money to upgrade existing buildings, while new schools would be built in growing parts of Adams 12, Brighton and Commerce City. Tax override revenues would be used to recruit and retain teachers, offset state budget cuts and cover a variety of needs. (See the spreadsheet at the bottom of this story for details on those district proposals and all tax measures statewide.)

Adams 12 Superintendent Chris Gdowski said the five sets of ballot measures weren’t coordinated but, “What’s driving it are common factors. We all have needs that haven’t been met.”

For Adams 12, he said, “The need is pressing, and we can’t wait any longer.”

Other county superintendent sounded the same note. “We decided to go this year because our needs just continue to mount,” said Mapleton Superintendent Charlotte Ciancio. “We have just been so far behind for so long … we just had to go.”

Westminster Superintendent Pamela Swanson said, “We’re trying to avoid any more cuts. We have some wonderful things happening, and we don’t want to take any steps backwards. We felt a moral obligation to go back out” to the voters, even though the district saw a $5.2 million override defeated last year.

Commerce City Superintendent Pat Sanchez had a bond issue defeated last year by about 300 votes. He called that a “hidden blessing” that forced the district “to be really crystal clear about what the voters are getting” this year. He and other Adams superintendents are hopeful that academic improvements in recent years will make voters more amendable to tax hikes.

Adams 12, Brighton and Mapleton are rated as “improvement” districts by the state accreditation system. Commerce City and Westminster are “priority improvement” districts but have moved up in recent years from “turnaround,” the lowest accreditation category.

Superintendents have varying answers about what happens if proposals are defeated. Gdowski said a loss could mean schedule changes in Adams 12. Sanchez said defeat “would change a five-year plan to a 10-year plan,” and Ciancio said, “If it doesn’t pass we’ll just have to keep going back to the ballot.”

Around the state

Two districts in El Paso County also have large measures on the ballot. Cheyenne Mountain is proposing a $45 million bond, and Falcon’s bond proposal totals $107.4 million.

Denver voters face a proposed sales tax increase and an extension for the Denver Preschool Program, which is separate from DPS. (Get more details here.)

There are no district proposals on the ballot this year in Denver, Douglas County, Jefferson County or in any of Arapahoe County’s seven districts.

State law bars school boards and districts from spending public funds on ballot measure campaigns.

The campaign load typically is carried by outside citizen campaign committees that raise money for brochures, yard signs and other materials. Such committees already have been formed in Boulder, in most of the Adams County districts and in Cheyenne Mountain and Falcon.

The bigger issue

Passage of bond issues and overrides in individual districts has the unwelcome side effect of increasing gaps between districts that have the political and financial capacity to pass them and those that don’t. (There’s a limit on district bond debt based on the value of property within a district, and there also are state ceilings on overrides.)

“The long range solution to this [school funding] is not doing this district by district,” Messinger said. “I worry that the gap [between districts] could widen over time,” said Gdowski.

But Sanchez, noting that there’s still a $900 million shortfall in state school funding, said it’s hard to districts to resist the pressure to raise their own money. “I think you’re going to see a trend of more bonds and mill levy overrides.”

Chalkbeat Colorado is a nonprofit news site covering educational change in public schools.

Chalkbeat Colorado is the education news partner of the Denver Business Journal. Chalkbeat reports are copyright © Chalkbeat and used by permission. For more Chalkbeat reports, visit co.chalkbeat.org.

Corn, a vegetable which can be a cultivation of &quot;MON 810&quot;, a variety of genetically modified maize (corn) developed by the US agro-chemicals

Corn, a vegetable which can be a cultivation of “MON 810″, a variety of genetically modified maize (corn) developed by the US agro-chemicals Monsanto Company. (Philippe Huguen, AFP )

Colorado’s fall election ballot was set Monday, as the Secretary of State’s Office certified four issues for voters to decide, including the definition of a person, casino gambling in three counties, food labeling and open meetings.

The citizen-driven efforts to amend the state’s constitution were finalized to go on the ballots mailed on Oct. 14.

“Coloradans have again shown they are eager to participate directly in the public policy of our state by putting four measures on the ballot,” Secretary of State Scott Gessler said Monday after certifying the ballot questions.

Amendments and propositions certified Monday are:

Amendment 67, which would provide a legal definition of a person. The measure is seen by opponents as a way to stop all abortions and imperil the storage or destruction of eggs for in vitro fertilization. The proposed amendment states: “In the interest of protecting mothers and their unborn children from criminal offenses and unborn children from criminal offenses and negligent and wrongful acts, the words ‘person’ and ‘child’ in the Colorado criminal code and Colorado death act must include unborn human beings.”

Proposition 105, which calls for the labeling of genetically modified food “to provide consumers with the opportunity to make an informed choice of the products they consume and protect the public’s health, safety and welfare.”

Amendment 68, which would allow horse racing tracks in Arapahoe, Pueblo and Mesa counties to offer casino-style games, with 34 percent of their adjusted gross proceeds, which supporters estimate will reach $100 million, to fund K-12 schools.

Proposition 104, which would provide more open-meetings requirements for school boards.

The personhood issue, the thorniest of those on the ballot, is in its fourth incarnation in Colorado in six years.

The measure failed in elections in 2008 and 2010. Two years ago, opponents successfully challenged whether personhood supporters submitted enough valid signatures.

The definition has evolved. In 2008, the amendment defined a person from the “moment of fertilization.” In 2010 it changed to “from the beginning of the biological development.”

Joey Bunch: 303-954-1174, jbunch@denverpost.com or twitter.com/joeybunch

http://www.denverpost.com/election2014/ci_26493625/colorado-ballot-decisions-include-personhood-gmo-food-horse

Gary Mikes & Cory Gardner

Dear fellow Adams County Republicans,

I hope the end of this beautiful summer finds you well.

As the newly elected Chairman of the Adams County Republican Party, I would like to introduce myself and personally invite you to attend our Lincoln Day Dinner, being held on September 20, 2014 at the Brittany Hill Restaurant in Thornton. Tickets can be purchased on our website at http://adamscountygop.com/adams-county-republicans-lincoln-day-dinner/. We will be celebrating the leadership of the first Republican President Abraham Lincoln. Our next Lieutenant Governor, Jill Repella will be the master of ceremonies to introduce the famous Trevor Loudon as our keynote speaker.

As you are probably aware, the 2014 election season is in full swing. Fortunately for the conservative movement, we are blessed to have a full slate of very motivated, energetic and accountable candidates that I am very proud and excited to support. I have realized the momentum and the positive outlook towards our candidates here in Adams County and know that they are all in desperate need of your help to keep it going. Volunteers are key to a successful campaign, especially here in Adams County where we are outnumbered so severely. The next month, before the ballots are mailed out on October 14 is a critical time for us to reach as many voters as possible. Your Republican candidates need your time, your talents and your treasures to be successful in November.

The upcoming Lincoln Day Dinner is a perfect opportunity to meet and get to know many of your new candidates and current elected officials. A perfect opportunity to forge relationships and find a candidate or three that you can get behind and really make a difference in this upcoming election. Now is the time, for our Community, for our County, for our State and our Nation. Now is the time to help set us on the Right path forward.

Please contact your candidates directly to offer your support in any way that you can and know that you could be an important factor in their success.

Eric Hansen, County Commissioner District 3, 303-596-0293, qeghhansen@msn.com

Joseph Domenico, County Commissioner District 4, 303-289-5990, jpdomenicoacc@gmail.com

Jan Pawlowski, County Commissioner District 5, 303-659-4670, jan.pawlowski@rocketmail.com

Michael McIntosh, Sheriff, 303-912-6398, mtmcintosh33@gmail.com

Stan Martin, County Clerk and Recorder, 303-875-1022, martinccinc@msn.com

Bridgett Grimm,  Treasurer, 720-341-4129, bc_grimm@yahoo.com

Patsy Melonakis, Assessor, 303-909-6080, patsyhm@comcast.net

Dr. Mike Arnall, Coroner, 303-655-1258, forensic@gate.net

Rich Monroe, RTD board of directors district K, 720-505-7680, rich_monroe@hotmail.com

Beth Martinez Humenik, State Senate District 24, 303-907-6995, bethmartinezhumeniksd24@gmail.com

Mike Melvin, State House District 34, 303-748-7396, mike@coloradoformike.com

Carol Beckler,  State House District 31,303-564-4257, jodycjb@gmail.com

Alexander “Skinny” Winkler, State House District 34, 303-875-5678, skinny@vote4skinny.com

Joann Windholz, State House District 30, 303-995-0866, joannwindholz@gmail.com

Kevin Priola, State House District 56, 303-882-5486, kpriola@gmail.com

Edgar Antillon, State House District 32, antillon0184@hotmail.com

Mike Coffman, US Congressional District 6

Don Ytterberg, US Congressional Districts 7, 303-762-0775, info@ytterbergforcongress.com

Cory Gardner, U.S. Senate

Bob Beauprez, Colorado Gov.

Wayne Williams, Secretary of State

Cynthia Coffman,  State Atty. Gen.

Walker Stapleton, State Treasurer

 

Thank you one and all for everything you have done and will continue to do to support the Adams County Republican Party, The Great Opportunity Party!

Sincerely yours in service,

Gary Mikes

Adams County Republican Party Chairman

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